Snakes

Snakes are abundant across Anglesey. There are few hot spots where you have a better chance of seeing them. Snakes love the heath and also the Marram Grass that grows on the sand dunes around Anglesey. They can hunt and bask in relative peace away from prying eyes. Small mammals, lizards, frogs, spiders, eggs and more are all on the menu. Where there are snakes on Anglesey you will also come across common Lizards.

a picture of a common grass snake
Grass Snake

Adders are the UK’s only poisonous snake species, they are recognisable by their diamond patterned skin. They can be found all over Anglesey and other parts of the UK, this island habitat is perfect for them. Between October and March Adders hibernate, only emerging when the weather is warm enough. You can see them basking on rocks, the heat from the sun kick starts their metabolism. As they are cold blooded they need the sun to warm there blood, this heat allows them to hunt.

Poisonous or not they are a shy species and will not usually attack humans. Bites tend to happen if they are stood on by accident. Dogs do get bitten occasionally due to there inquisitive nature. It’s not uncommon for this to happen if they come across a snake in the long grass. The bite is defensive in nature and they will try to get away from perceived danger if they can.

Grass Snakes are found across the UK, they are the largest of our snake species. Males grow to around 90cm and females can grow up to 190cm, they are usually olive green in colour. They lack the diamond skin pattern of the Adders and are also found on Anglesey.

Great places to spot snakes on Anglesey are South Stack, Holyhead Mountain, Breakwater Coastal Park and the dunes around Newborough, Rhosneigr and Aberffraw. The latter three have Marram grass covered dunes where they like to hunt. The former two have an abundance of heath for them to hunt in with open areas for basking in the sun. That said if you are lucky you could find them in plenty of other areas around the island.

If you really want to see them head for the sand dunes to the rear of Crigyll Beach or South Stack. More often than not, you will find them when you are not looking or if you have a keen eye. In early spring you will find them basking on rocks to

Remember these are wild creatures and they can give a serious and venomous bite. Observe them at a safe distance and never try to touch or provoke them. Safety first, always.

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